Huang Xiaoming 黄晓明

Actor Huang Xiaoming (left) and designer Zhang Shuai wear



Actor Huang Xiaoming (left) and designer Zhang Shuai wear creations of M-77, a new fashion label they launched, at the brand’s first fashion show in Beijing. 

Huang Xiaoming may have just launched a label with designer Zhang Shuai, yet the Chinese film star insists he won’t be tapping into fans to push sales.

Wearing a black T-shirt bearing a large “M” on the chest and a pair of matching pants, A-list actor Huang Xiaoming was looking sharp in the outfit he had a hand in designing.

Last week, the 40-year-old star and the emerging designer Zhang Shuai jointly launched their fashion label M-77, and held the brand’s first fashion show for its fall/winter collection at the National Agriculture Exhibition Hall in downtown Beijing.

Born in Qingdao in East China’s Shandong province, Huang recalls his family was not able to afford good clothes when he was young.

“My mother had to tailor old clothes to make them look new and trendy. I was happy to wear them then,” says Huang.

His adolescent struggle for affordable fashion has translated into a strong desire to make non-luxury, good-value clothing for those in a similar situation.

“In those years, youngsters were usually very excited to have new clothes, but they were usually difficult to satisfy,” he explains.

Huang explains the concept behind M-77: While “M” stands for man, “77” refers to the 1970s.

He also promises the brand will focus on producing inexpensive yet good-value items to make them affordable for ordinary people, as well as adding some Chinese elements to make it more appealing than some other foreign rivals.

Huang also reveals that he will play an important role in designing the clothes, and bring his favorite elements to the brand, such as military uniforms.

Read the entire article at the source.


Source: F!Yeah Huang Xiaoming

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Zhang Ziyi and Huang Xiaoming's lost film to release next year

The mysterious epic FOREVER YOUNG starring Zhang Ziyi will be unveiled in January 2018 - 6 years after the project was first announced.

A stellar cast of Zhang Ziyi, Huang Xiaoming, Leehom Wang, Chang Chen and Chen Chusheng attended a press conference on Wednesday in Beijing to announce the release date as Jan. 12 next year.

The film, written and directed by acclaimed writer-turned-director Li Fangfang, was originally planned to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Tsinghua University in 2011, with a budget of over 100 million yuan. The story covers four generations spanning a hundred years of modern Chinese history since World War II.

Actress Zhang Ziyi and actor Huang Xiaoming both mentioned in previous interviews that they cried after reading the script. By the end of 2012, the film had finished shooting but nothing has been heard since. Director Li commented in June 2014 that she is extremely meticulous about post-production and the film will be ready for release by the end of that year. However, it was not.

Sun Zhonghuai, CEO of Penguin Pictures and Vice President at Tencent Holdings Ltd., one of the film’s producers, said the nearly 6-year wait has made this production “a legend” in Chinese film industry.

The past five years has witnessed great changes in the actors’ personal life. When the cast members shot the film, they were all single. Now they are all married with children.

Huang Xiaoming added, “First I was attracted by the director’s good script, then I was moved by her sincere creative work ethic, as she had researched and studied tens of thousands of historical photos and documents to reenact the historical details in her production. I believe a good film is like a good wine, the longer it takes to make the better it will taste.”

Director Li Fangfang later joined the cast on the stage and praised them, “every one of them wanted to act as best as they can for their roles. We worked sincerely together and hope to tell a good story.”

It is also worth noting that the film was shot in film stock and may be the last film in China produced this way as most film processing studios have closed as Chinese filmmakers turn to digital filmmaking.


Source: F!Yeah Huang Xiaoming

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